Review of ‘The Mapmaker Chronicles’

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The lovely Jazzy joins us again today to review of my absolute favouite series of the last year, ‘The Mapmaker Chronicles’ by A.L. Tait, who I’ve interviewed here. Allison Tait joins me in my car every week as I listen to her and Valerie Khoo co-host the very excellent podcast, ‘So You Want to be a Writer?’, which is one of the best podcasts around for anyone interested in the world of literature, the technicalities of writing, blogging world goss and the Australian writing scene.  I digress. Allison is a talented journalist, blogger, podcaster, conference/school/festival presenter and author and Jazzy is a big fan! For more reviews by Jazzy click here or visit her beautiful blog here. 

To add ‘The Mapmaker Chronicles’ series to your home, school or library collection click on covers of title links. Purchase on ibooks below.the-mapmaker-chronicles

When I met A.L. Tait (see below) I had absolutely no idea that it would open a whole new world to me. This bubbly and adventurous author introduced me to Children’s Books Daily who I now review books for. I am honoured to have the opportunity to talk about her creation, The Mapmaker Chronicles: Race to the End of the World.JazzyandauthorAlisonTaitTHE GIST

This high-seas adventure story is about a fourteen year-old boy named Quinn who leaves home to learn how to create maps. While he is away he gets paid – all the better for his poor family. After passing a test, Quinn is chosen to sail all around the world and create a map of what he finds along the way. Despite a reluctant start, Quinn gets to know the crew and even the mysterious slave captain, Zain and starts to enjoy the adventure. All of the crew are slaves except for Aysha and Cleric Greenfield. Quinn faces many obstacles such as wild storms, monsters, mean competitors and even murderers on his way.

THE JUDGEMENT

Quinn is the youngest of five brothers, all of which annoy him all the time. They are much bigger than he is, much stronger than he is; they pretty much are the opposite of Quinn. In the beginning he is a normal kid, but by the end he is the perfect hero. He learns a very, very important lesson: To, ‘ride the flow while it is strong and against you. Then challenge it while the time is right.’ To me, this lesson is about patience and hard times.

This thrilling voyage features some very eccentric people: Big, bulky and loud but not very talkative Zain; huge-moustached Jericho; enthusiastic, optimistic Ajax and heaps of other crazy characters.

A.L Tait has also included some hilarious characters, like Odilon, a man who is, and also looks like he is, ridiculously rich. Odilon doesn’t care about others and loves himself. Inside his bedroom there are lush tapestries hanging off the walls for warmth and quiet and all over the ship there are golden door handles!

When I finished The Mapmaker Chronicles: Race to the End of the World, I felt satisfied with what I’d just read. It included everything that I believe should be in a maritime fantasy, from monsters to secret islands.MapmakerChronicles Set

This book is the first part of The Mapmaker Chronicles trilogy. The second story is called Prisoner of the Black Hawk and the third is called Breath of the Dragon. I am looking forward to reading the next two.

I think that The Mapmaker Chronicles: Race to the End of the World should be age nine and over because there are some gruesome scenes and the partly complex storyline.

I give The Mapmaker Chronicles: Race to the End of the World four-and-a-half bookbolts out of five. 4halfbookbolts
Publisher: Hachette Australia

ISBN: 978-0-7344-1577-6

The titles of each book takes you to the Australian based online bookstore Booktopia. You can also compare prices on Fishpond and Bookworld for Australian purchases.If you live in the US or would prefer to use Amazon click here. If you live in the UK or would prefer to use Book Depository click here. Purchases clicked through from the Children’s Books Daily site result in a small commission. Commission is used in part to maintain Children’s Books Daily and to support community groups which connect children with books.

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